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Bunny Care Guide

If you have any questions, or need any clarifications about anything, please feel free to reach out, we are always happy to help out. We recommend doing your own research as well, this is just a guide of the most important things to get you started, there is a lot to learn and we learn new things everyday ourselves! 

CONTENTS: Click the links to jump to each section!

The Basics - Bunny Care 101
Rabbit Diet
Water
Litter Training
Enclosures and Free Roaming
Grooming

Toys and Enrichment
Bonding with Your Bunny
Bonding Multiple Bunnies
Spaying and Neutering 
Health
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THE BASICS - BUNNY CARE 101

This is just a quick overview of the most important points to get you started! You can use the contents section above to jump to different parts of our bunny care guide and read more in depth on those topics!

Quality grass hay is 80% of a bunny's diet and provides essential fiber to their diet. Bunnies need unlimited 24/7 access to hay and they eat about their own body size in hay daily. Timothy and Orchard are great options! Adult bunnies can't have alfalfa hay. Oxbow, Small Pet Select, Viking Farmer, and Rabbit Hole Hay are great places to purchase hay online. You can also look for a local source. The main things to look for when buying quality hay are long thick strands, nice green color, fresh smell, & minimal dust.

Bunnies under 3 months old can have unlimited access to alfalfa based pellets to help them grow, and adults only need ⅛-¼ cup of pellets. Quality pellets should be green in color and fresh smelling with no extra ingredients. Great brands of pellets are Oxbow, Small Pet Select, and Sherwood. Do NOT feed your bun fiesta mixes (pellets with colorful bits mixed in) or commercial treats, as they often contain unhealthy ingredients. Always transition to new foods slowly to prevent digestive upset. 

Generally, most people say not to feed rabbits vegetables or fruits until they are 5-6 months old because rabbits have very sensitive digestive tracts and too many veggies too soon can cause diarrhea or GI stasis, so be careful! Once a rabbit is an adult, you can feed him/her about 1 cup of a variety of leafy greens and veggies daily per 2-3 pounds of body weight. Fruits and other treats should always be fed in moderation, only about 1 to 2 tablespoons a few times a week. Do NOT feed a baby rabbit fruits.

Rabbits need constant access to fresh water, so it’s a good idea to get an automatic waterer that can hold a lot of water. You can also use a large ceramic bowl that can’t be tipped over and refresh it often. Rabbits can sometimes become dehydrated when drinking from water bottles, but you could have both a large water bottle and bowl so the bun can choose which to drink from.

Bunnies need a lot of space to exercise, binky, play, and do zoomies! I highly recommend getting an x-pen or building a custom pen out of cube shelf panels ziptied together since these options allow your bun to have more space, are easy to setup and clean, and are usually more affordable than small cages marketed for bunnies. You can even get multiple pens and ziptie them together to make a larger enclosure for your bun! If protecting your floor is a concern, you can purchase waterproof rolls of vinyl  from Home Depot, Lowe's, Ollies, etc. to put under the pen (make sure the edges are outside the pen so your bun can't chew them) and then add washable rugs/carpet, fleece blankets, or reusable dog pee pads (these work fantastic for our buns) to provide your bunny with traction. You can also choose to bunny proof a room, part of your house, or the whole thing for your bunny to free-roam!

The best litter boxes for rabbits are actually advertised as cat litter boxes or under storage tubs. The larger the better. You want your bun to have enough space to comfortably fit a large bundle of hay on one side and be able to turn around in the box. Always put all of their hay in or above the litter box to encourage your bun to use the litter box. Expect to refill the hay twice a day. 
For the litter, do NOT use clumping cat litter or clay litter as these are unsafe for buns. Instead use a thin layer of kiln dried pine pellets or recycled paper pellets. You can also add a layer of paper bedding on top of the pellets for comfort. 

If your rabbit doesn’t naturally use the box, sweep up the poo and put it in the litter box. If he/she pees anywhere, soak it up with a paper towel and put it in the litter box. This will help the bun know where to do its business. You can clean up the remaining urine with apple cider vinegar to get rid of the smell. Encourage good litter box habits, and clean your rabbit’s litter box at least once every 3 days, and your bun should do well with it.


RABBIT DIET - HAY

80% of a rabbit’s diet is grass hay. It’s the most important part of a rabbit’s daily intake and should be available for them to eat and nibble on at all times. It keeps the digestive tract moving and prevents GI stasis. Unlimited grass hay, such as timothy or orchard should be fed daily. Usually, a rabbit will eat a bundle of hay around the same size as his/her body in a day (some eat more). Put the hay in or over the litter box. Make sure that the hay you have consists of nice long strands and smells fresh. If it is a little dusty, shake it out before giving it to your bunny. 

I highly recommend Timothy grass hay as it is higher in fiber and promotes healthy digestion. If you are allergic to Timothy hay, (a lot of people allergic to bunnies are actually allergic to the hay) you can feed Orchard or a different kind of rabbit-safe hay. Different kinds of hay have different nutrients, so you can offer a variety of hay types to balance them out, if you choose to do this, I recommend slowly adding one at a time so you don’t overwhelm your bunny’s digestive system. 

Younger rabbits can have alfalfa hay (
adults can’t have alfalfa, unless recommended by your rabbit-savvy vet to help gain weight or for some other specific reason), though it is a good idea to mix it with timothy, so that he/she can be transitioned to another hay later. Alfalfa hay is chock-full of protein and calcium, so it is better for young bunnies, while it can be extremely unhealthy to feed to an adult rabbit. If you decide to feed your bun alfalfa hay, make sure to balance it out by feeding timothy pellets. Never feed both alfalfa pellets and alfalfa hay at the same time!

All of our bunnies eat unlimited Timothy grass hay blend, and we buy most of our hay from local farmers.
Hymer Feed Company in Lexington, KY, has amazing hay, so I highly recommend purchasing there if they have any available, it is some of the best quality hay that we have found anywhere. Some great brands of hay I have heard of are Oxbow (I love the 50lb boxed timothy hay which you can order online on Chewy), Small Pet Select, Viking Farmer, and Rabbit Hole Hay. Local sources are also great, although it may take a little more research to find the perfect one. The main things to look for when buying quality hay are long thick strands, nice green color, fresh smell, & minimal dust.

Bunnies can be really picky, so if your bun isn’t eating a lot of hay, you can try experimenting with different hay types or brands, you can get a sampler of different kinds to see which your bunny likes the most. If you are using a hay bag or feeder, putting some hay directly in the litter box so your bunny can play and burrow in it can help encourage them to eat more hay. You can also try offering toys with hay in them.


RABBIT DIET - PELLETS

Bunnies under 3 months are given unlimited access to pellets so they can grow. Once a bunny reaches 3 months of age, it’s a good idea to start cutting back on pellets. Adult rabbits only need ⅛-¼ cup of pellets per day. It is very important to feed your bunny quality, hay-based (alfalfa hay/meal for young bunnies or timothy hay/meal for adult bunnies is the #1 ingredient). There are a lot of low quality rabbit pellets on the market that are actually unhealthy to even feed your bunnies. Also, quality pellets should be GREEN in color, not brown, and smell fresh. Some great quality brands of pellets are Oxbow, Small Pet Select, and Sherwood. Do NOT feed your bun fiesta mixes (pellets with colorful bits mixed in) or commercial treats, as they often contain unhealthy ingredients. 

Bunnies have very sensitive digestive systems (especially when they are younger) so it is important to transition them to any new foods slowly and carefully to minimize the risk of upsetting their digestion. We always send our bunnies home with a gallon ziploc of transition pellets, so they will have plenty to mix in with whatever you purchase to feed them. The following is a general guideline for transitioning your bunny to a new kind of pellets:

Week 1    75% old pellets and 25% new pellets
Week 2    50% old pellets and 50% new pellets
Week 3    25% old pellets and 75% new pellets
Week 4+    100% new pellets

Your bunny might try to pick out the old pellets at first and this is completely normal, just continue mixing them together and they should start to eat the new kind and be fully transitioned by the end of four weeks.


RABBIT DIET - FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

For adult rabbits (6+ months), you can feed fruits as treats (bananas, strawberries, apples, watermelon, and blueberries are all good choices). You can also look up more safe treats online, just be sure to make sure that whatever you are thinking of giving to your bun is safe before you feed it to him/her. For young bunnies, feed oats, black oil sunflower seeds, or Calf Manna as treats. Fruits and other treats should always be fed in moderation, only about 1 to 2 tablespoons a few times a week. Do NOT feed a baby rabbit fruits. 

It is dangerous to feed young rabbits veggies, though there are some exceptions. You can start by feeding very small amounts of leafy greens: dandelion leaves, carrot tops (not the actual carrot), kale, spinach, spring greens, raspberry/blackberry leaves and herbs such as parsley and basil. Only feed a 2-inch by 2-inch section to start and only introduce one vegetable at a time. Some rabbits will get upset stomachs when eating particular foods, so if you only introduce one at a time, you will know who the culprit is.
Generally, most people say not to feed rabbits vegetables or fruits until they are 5-6 months old because rabbits have very sensitive digestive tracts and too many veggies too soon can cause diarrhea or GI stasis, so be careful! Once a rabbit is an adult, you can feed him/her about 1 cup of a variety of leafy greens daily per 2-3 pounds of body weight. There is lots of information about healthy veggies and greens that you can feed your bunny online. Always research to ensure a vegetable is safe before feeding it to your bunny.

WATER

Rabbits need constant access to fresh water, so it’s a good idea to get an automatic waterer that can hold a lot of water. You can also use a large ceramic bowl that can’t be tipped over and refresh it often. Rabbits can sometimes become dehydrated when drinking from water bottles, but you could have both a large water bottle and bowl so the bun can choose which to drink from.

You can put
apple cider vinegar (not white vinegar) in your rabbit’s water (about 1 to 2 tablespoons per gallon of water). It contains vitamins and minerals that make your bun a little healthier. It keeps rabbits from getting urinary tract infections, regulates HP levels, improves digestion by increasing nutrient absorption in the G.I. tract, makes them smell off to pests like mites or fleas, and keeps their fur shiny and smooth. 

LITTER TRAINING

It is very easy to litter box train a rabbit. The most common mistake is getting a litter box that is too small. Because rabbits eat and poop at the same time, there needs to be enough space in the litter box for the rabbit and a large bundle of hay the same size as (or larger than) the rabbit. Always put all of their hay in or above the litter box. Expect to refill the hay twice a day. The best litter boxes for rabbits are actually advertised as cat litter boxes. The larger the better. I have had a lot of luck with basic Petmate litter boxes, especially the jumbo ones.
 
For the litter, do NOT use clumping cat litter or clay litter. Instead use either pine pellets or recycled paper pellets. You can use paper bedding such as Carefresh, but this doesn’t hold the smell in or absorb enough urine compared to the pellets. You can get a 40 lb bag of equine pine pellets from tractor supply. They are most commonly used in horse stalls but make excellent rabbit litter because they smell natural. They also easily compost. Put a thin layer across the entire bottom of the litter box. You don’t need to put too much litter as rabbits do not bury their poop like cats do. If you want, you can put either Sweet PDZ in the bottom or a puppy training pad folded to fit the box (make sure this is completely covered by the litter so the bun doesn’t chew/consume the pad). Having a pad in there will also help absorb urine.
 
When bunnies first get to a new place, they might mark it by pooping or peeing everywhere. This is natural and usually lasts for a day or two. They will also sometimes pee on their new owner to mark them as their person. This is their way of saying they like you. If the rabbit doesn’t naturally use the box, sweep up the poo and put it in the litter box. If he/she pees anywhere, soak it up with a paper towel and put it in the litter box. This will help the bun know where to do its business. You can clean up the remaining urine with apple cider vinegar to get rid of the smell. Encourage good litter box habits, and clean your rabbit’s litter box at least once every 3 days, and your bun should do well with it.

Bunnies can be stubborn and will naturally choose one place to use the bathroom, so if you find your bunny is using the same spot outside of their litter box, you can try moving the box there or getting a second box for them to have there instead. Sometimes, you will also need to have more than one litter box, especially if your bunny is free-roaming and has access to a lot of space or if you have multiple bunnies.


ENCLOSURES AND FREE ROAMING

I highly recommend free-roaming your bunny if that is an option for your home, since it allows your bunny to become a part of the family and has several substantial benefits to both your bunnies physical and mental health. Free-roam bunnies live a lifestyle that naturally encourages them to be active and get lots of exercise, this helps to prevent obesity and promote urinary and joint health. Free-roam bunnies also have access to lots of mental and social stimulation which helps to prevent boredom and make a healthy, happy bunny. The special human-animal bond between you and your bun can also be strengthened by having your bunny free-roam in your home with you, as it allows your bunny to learn to trust and coexist with you on a daily basis. You can also choose to only let your bunny free roam in a particular part or room of the house that has been bunny-proofed.

If you have a goal of free-roaming, I recommend starting out in a smaller space (x-pens or play pens work great) while your bunny is getting adjusted to their new home, so you can sit in there to bond with your bun and they can get the hang of using their litter box in new surroundings before free-roaming. As your bunny gets used to using the litter box, you can slowly expand their space until they are fully free-roam. You can also leave the pen out as a homebase for them since bunnies like to have a territory that is their safe space.
 
Before letting your bunny have full roam of the house, pick up anything on lower shelves or on the floor, cover wires with wire covers, and put protectors on wood furniture legs. Bunnies will sometimes chew on baseboards, cabinets etc. You can try applying bitter apple spray on anything that you don’t want your bunny chewing. There are also some more effective DIY sprays to keep buns from chewing. There are lots of helpful guides to bunny proofing your home online that you can read to get more tips!

If you have a cage for your bunny, make sure it spends at least 5-8 hrs a day out of its cage and exercising, running around, etc. Bunnies need space to binky and play. When they are caged 24/7, they can also become depressed, lethargic, and disinterested. If you do decide to use a cage, a good choice is a large dog crate. Another great option for an enclosure is a x-pen or play pen. These are easy to set up and will provide your bunny with more space to run and binky. You can even attach multiple of them together with zip ties, or if you already have a cage for your bunny you can zip tie a play pen onto it to give your bunny more space. You can also make a custom pen out of wire shelf panels zip tied together, these are great since they are very easy to customize. Amazon has lots of great options available and you can also find several pens at in person stores. You can use vinyl, foam puzzle mats, baby mats, washable rugs, etc. under your bunny’s setup to protect the floor if needed. If you choose a slicker flooring like vinyl (great because it is super easy to clean in case of accidents) you can put in some rugs for your bunny to provide them with traction. You don’t need bedding in their enclosure and can instead provide a fleece blanket or liner as a comfortable place for your bunny to lay.


GROOMING

Rabbits generally need to have their nails trimmed either once a month or bi-weekly, and they need to be brushed at least once a week regularly and once or twice a day during molts. If they go unbrushed, they can swallow a lot of fur while grooming, which can cause an intestinal blockage.  

You can trim your bunny’s nails at home with pet nail clippers. Just be careful not to cut the quick, pinkish region of the nail, it can be hard to spot on darker bunnies but with some practice you can get a feel for it. You can always start by just trimming the tips of their nails to be safe. Always be patient and work at a pace you and your bunny feel comfortable with. There are lots of helpful videos about trimming your bunny’s nails online. It is fairly easy to do once you get a hang for it. Most rabbit vets will also trim your bunny’s nails for a small fee, if you aren’t comfortable doing it at home. After every grooming session, give your bunny positive reinforcement, this can be in the form of age-appropriate treats, some pellets, or some head pets! This will help to make grooming a more positive experience for everyone.

Bunnies will groom themselves, so they do not require baths, and you should NEVER submerge your bunny in water. They are terrified of water and can have heart attacks while being bathed or go into shock. They can also get pneumonia because their fur is thicker and it’s very hard for them to get dry. Rabbits do not have natural body odors that make them smell bad, though their urine can smell awful if it isn’t being dealt with properly. If a rabbit’s bottom is particularly dirty, you can give him/her a bottom bath and only let the feet/butt touch the water. After cleaning the rabbit’s bottom, use a blow dryer on fan or low to dry him/her. This should not be a common occurrence. To clean off pee stains on your rabbit, use cornstarch powder and if possible a small, quiet vacuum to keep from breathing in too much of the dusty substance. Rub the cornstarch into dirty spots on the fur, and it should get some of the staining/pee out.


TOYS AND ENRICHMENT

Bunnies need love, toys, and daily enrichment. Provide at least 3 toys on a regular basis. When your bunny gets bored of these, switch them out for other toys (usually once a week). Bunnies like cat bell balls, wiffle balls, and natural woven balls (seagrass, willow). They love toys with bells in them and also enjoy baby stacking cups. Apple wood and willow chews are also great! You can get several natural rabbit toys from Small Pet Select. They have a variety of chews, twists, pinecones, loofahs, mobiles, and mats for bunnies to chew on/play with. Because bunny teeth are constantly growing, it’s a good idea to provide something to chew on. Bunnies also love tunnels and hidey houses. They will do zoomies through tunnels, and it’s so fun to watch! Chewy and Etsy are also good places to get toys for your bun.

Some great DIY bunny toys include cardboard tubes stuffed with hay or cardboard boxes with holes cut in them as hides. You can also build bunny mazes with several cardboard boxes and put kraft paper or hay in them then sprinkle some treats or pellets in there, to make a fun foraging adventure for your bunny. Pinecones and bunny safe wood (such as Apple or Willow) can also make great chew toys if safely prepared for them.

You can also use snuffle mats, treat balls, or other foraging toys to feed your bunny pellets or other treats. This is a more natural way of eating for bunnies, and helps stimulate their brains and provide them with hours of fun and enrichment during eating time. 


BONDING WITH YOUR BUNNY

We love on our buns a ton from day one, to ensure that they will have as smooth of a transition as possible to being a spoiled, loving companion and part of your family! Bunnies are amazingly sweet and can be very affectionate once they trust and form a bond with you. Every bunny is unique and has their own personality, so while some approaches might appeal to one bunny they might not be as effective with a different bunny. It can take from a few weeks to a few months before your bunny is fully adjusted to their new home, but can be longer or shorter depending on the individual bunny. It is important to be patient while your bunny is getting used to their new surroundings and is warming up to you. Always show your bunny unconditional love and you will be on the way to forming a lifelong bond. It can take time to bond with your bun, but in the end it is 100% worth it!

To help your bunny adjust to their new environment, you can put several hides (cardboard boxes can work great!) in their space. This will allow your bunny to have a safe places to go, and can help them to be more comfortable. You can also put something with your scent on it (a shirt you have slept in or a blanket, preferably something you don't mind possibly having to throw away) in their pen for the first few days to help your bunny acclimate to your scent in a non-invasive way. 

Bunnies generally prefer to be on the floor running around, playing, and exploring or sitting in your lap on the ground, rather than being held up high in the air. Since they are prey animals and are naturally afraid of heights, it feels like a hawk has lifted them, they feel safer close to the ground. It is good to hold your bunny to get them used to being held in case of emergencies, vet trips, etc. but I recommend waiting until after your bun has had a few days to adjust to their new home before you start trying to handle them (you can judge how comfortable your bunny is by if they are still hiding or if they have opened up and started exploring). When you do hold your bunny, always be sure to
fully support your bun and hold them securely so they will feel safer. You can hold your bunny with all four paws against your chest to help them feel safe. Never hold your bunny on its back. This is called trancing and while your bunny may look relaxed, it is actually a very stressful position for them and they are unable to move.

A great way to bond with your bunny is by sitting or laying on the ground at your bunny’s level. This helps you to be less intimidating and more approachable for your bunny. Try to spend as much time as you can just sitting with your bunny in their space, you can do computer work, read a book, or do some other quiet activity and wait for your bunny to come to you. I also highly recommend hand feeding your bunny pellets and age-appropriate treats (veggies/fruits for 6+ months, always introduce any new foods slowly, and oats or baked hay-based treats for baby buns), it will make them love you! This way, your bunny will associate you with positive things and will be more likely to come to you. Bunnies are very intelligent and can also learn tricks!! This is also a great way to deepen your bond with your bunny!

BONDING MULTIPLE BUNNIES

Bunnies can do great in pairs if bonded and can definitely enjoy and benefit from the company of another bunny especially if you spend a large portion of your day away from home (at work, etc) then you might want to consider getting your bunny a friend. Even if you spend a ton of time with them, there is something special about having bonded buns and watching them groom each other, eat together, and flop together. Bunnies can also do great as single buns (some actually prefer to be the only bunny) as long as they get lots of attention and interaction!! So if you are only wanting one bunny, I would definitely recommend starting out with just one (you can always get a second bun if you decide that you want to try to bond), on the other hand if you are wanting two then you can get two and oftentimes they will enjoy each other’s company after they have been bonded. You would just need to be prepared to have two large enclosures (or rooms/spaces) for them in case they don’t bond. I have also seen trios (and sometimes larger groups too) of bunnies that are bonded, so it is definitely possible, you would just need to be very cautious and prepared in case they don’t end up getting along.

Every two bunnies are different, so bonding buns isn’t an exact science but there are several things you can do that can make the process smoother and easier. Sometimes two bunnies will become instant pals and other times they will need a longer introduction period. There is a facebook group that gives advice on bonding bunnies called Rabbit Bonding Advice that you can join for lots of helpful info. I also learned a lot from bonded bunnies’ Instagram accounts, since some people will document their bonding process on there! Here are a couple Instagram accounts that have documented their bonding process (you can just watch their bonding stories): @peanutbutterandtheplants and @littleloppyroo. I also highly recommend spaying/neutering your bunnies if you are planning on bonding them, this will help to reduce their hormones which will make it less likely for your bunnies to fight and can prevent unwanted pregnancies as well. It is recommended to wait until 8 weeks after their surgery before you introduce your bunnies to each other. I have read that male/female fixed pairs will get along the best, but I know of several people that have multiple girl or multiple boy bunnies that are just as great friends! 

Always be patient and introduce your bunnies in neutral territory (somewhere neither of them have been before). If you don’t have any neutral territory in your house, I have seen some people use the bathtub or set up a x-pen with sheets to prevent them from seeing out of it. You can also use enzymatic cleaners to remove your bunny’s scent from the area and help prevent them from being territorial and fighting. You will also need to clean their area where they will live together once bonded before putting them together there to help prevent fights from breaking out then. You can also pre-bond your bunnies by switching items out from their different spaces (bowls, blankets, etc.) and see how they react. You can also set up their spaces so they have a double barrier between them (a few inches apart to prevent them from biting each other through the bars) so they can see and smell each other but don’t have the risk of fighting. You can use x-pens, baby gates, zip tied wire panels, etc. to do this.

There are several different methods of bonding including 24/7 bonding where you start in a small space and slowly expand, several short sessions bonding, etc. You will need to figure out what method is best for you and your bunnies.


SPAYING AND NEUTERING

There are several substantial benefits to getting your bunny fixed. These include a longer, healthier life and lowered risk of cancer especially in female bunnies. Spaying/neutering also helps with litter box training and reduces your bunny’s hormones (reducing marking, digging, scratching, nipping, and other hormonal behaviors) and it is very important to get your bunny fixed if you ever decide you want to try bonding them with another bunny. If you do decide to get your bunnies spayed/neutered, it is very important to find an experienced rabbit vet to do it since it can be risky if done improperly. The House Rabbit Society has a very helpful article about spaying/neutering bunnies. They have lots of pointers on questions to ask your vet, info about after care so you can be as best prepared as possible, and a rabbit vet list (not exhaustive so you might be able to google and call around to find a good vet near you that isn't listed, just don't be afraid to ask them questions to see if they are rabbit-savvy, there are some good questions on this site too)

HEALTH

Bunnies are prey animals so they are very good at hiding their pain, and oftentimes you won’t know there is something wrong until it is too late, that is why it is very important to be observant of your bunny and their behaviors and routines so you will notice the instant something changes. If you notice any major changes in your bunny’s behavior (lethargic, not moving around, etc.) or poop (runny stools, diarrhea, small deformed poops, not very much poo, or no poo at all) then you should consult a rabbit-savvy vet as soon as possible. It is very important for bunnies to have their digestive systems constantly moving, so your bunny needs to be eating a substantial amount of food a day to promote good digestive health or they are at risk of experiencing GI stasis which can be deadly. You should never withhold food from your bunny. A healthy diet with lots of high fiber hay and fresh water available 24/7, enrichment, and exercise will help to promote good health and prevent health problems. Accidents can still happen, and sometimes bunnies will get sick for no apparent reason, so it is always good to be as prepared as possible so you can act fast and treat problems as soon as you notice them to have the best chance of keeping your bunny healthy and happy! I highly recommend having Oxbow critical care, syringes, heat pads, baby gas drops, and any other bunny first-aid supplies on hand in case of emergencies.

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Rabbit Diet
Water
Litter Training
Enclosures and Free Roaming
Grooming
Toys and Enrichment
Bonding with Your Bunny
Boning Multiple Bunnies
Spaying and Neutering
Health
The Basics
Follow Us
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